PREVENTION OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

February 2015

LIM College is proud to stand up against violence against women. The College does not tolerate sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking
(see below for legal definitions).

If you are being abused or suspect that someone on campus has been abused, seek assistance from professor, staff member, dean, RA, or Emergency Response Building Team Member.

Additionally, LIM College will not tolerate retaliation against those who report sexual violence.

Some Startling Statistics

The following statistics were compiled by the New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault

  • At least 1 in 4 college women will be the victim of a sexual assault during her academic career.1
  • At least 80% of all sexual assaults are committed by an acquaintance of the victim.2
  • 48.8% of college women who were victims of attacks that met the study’s definition of rape did not consider what happened to them rape.3
  • On average, at least 50% of college students’ sexual assaults are associated with alcohol use - 74% of perpetrators and 55% of rape victims had been drinking alcohol prior to the assault.4
  • In a survey of high school students, 56% of girls and 76% of boys [some of whom may be incoming college freshmen] believed forced sex was acceptable under some circumstances.5

Prevention of Rape on Campus

Women

  • Limit drinking and be mindful so that no one tampers with your drink
  • Stay with a friend or group of friends and be aware of potentially dangerous sexual situations – plan prior to going out.
  • Be forceful and confident when saying “no”
  • Never leave a friend behind – if you leave with 3, return with 3!
  • Trust your instincts – if it feels wrong it probably is
  • Sign up for a Rape Aggression Defense Course (RAD)
  • Understand that video voyeurism, secretly capturing images of another person in a private place without consent, is considered sexual assault.

Men

  • Plan ahead before going out and agree to stand up for women
  • Limit drinking
  • Understand the definition of sexual assault and consent – an intoxicated individual is not capable of providing consent – therefore, having sex with an intoxicated person is considered rape
  • If you see someone acting inappropriately, be a good bystander and step in!
  • Understand that video voyeurism, secretly capturing images of another person in a private place without consent, is considered sexual assault.

What to do if you have been sexually assaulted:

Ask for help, make a call:

  • 911
  • Student Services or Residence Life
  • Friends or family
  • Crisis hotline 800-656-HOPE (4673)

Go to urgent care (e.g., a hospital):

  • Receive help for physical injuries.
  • Screen for STDs/pregnancy.
  • If possible, do not shower or clean up. Do not change clothes. Hospital staff can collect evidence using a rape kit.
  • If you want to file a police report, you can call the police from the emergency room.
  • Ask about the nearest rape crisis center. 

Take the Quiz

The quiz below was developed by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to help women determine if they are being abused. Take the quiz if you suspect you are being abused:

Does the person you love...

  1. Threaten to hurt you or your children?
  2. Say it's your fault if he or she hits you, then promises it won't happen again (but it does)?
  3. Put you down in public or keep you from contacting family or friends?
  4. Throw you down, push, hit, choke, kick, or slap you?
  5. Force you to have sex when you don't want to?

Just one "yes" answer means you're involved in an abusive relationship. If so, you're not alone and you have choices. No one deserves to be abused.

Actions if Being Abused

If you are in an abusive relationship, it is important to create a safety plan. Domestic violence advocates and teen dating abuse advocates are people who are trained to help you create a safety plan. Advocates can:

  • Figure out ways for you to leave an abuser
  • Discuss how to deal with emergencies
  • Suggest safe places to go, such as a shelter or the home of a friend or family member where your abuser might not look
  • Help you learn about a court order of protection, which requires your abuser to stay away from you
  • Suggest services and provide support

For help putting together a plan or finding advocates, contact the LIM College Counseling and Wellness Services Office at Maxwell Hall on the 14th Floor. (212) 752-1530 x 315

Additionally you can do any or all of the following:

  • Calling the police. If you are in immediate danger, call 911.
  • Calling hotlines. Learn more about different help hotlines. Hotlines provide support and resources. They also can help you create a safety plan for leaving an abuser.
  • Reaching out to people you trust. People who care want to help. You can start with family, friends, or community organizations.
  • Talking to a health care professional. Doctors, nurses, and counselors can offer physical aid, emotional support, and resources. Go to a hospital emergency room if you need immediate help for injuries.
  • Contacting an advocate. Advocates are people who are trained to help someone who has lived through domestic violence, dating violence, or sexual assault. You can talk to an advocate on the phone or in person, confidentially and for free. Advocates can explain options and programs in your community that may include legal support, counseling, emergency services, and other resources. You can learn more by calling help hotlines such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-799-SAFE (7233) or the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline at 866-331-9794.

Take the Pledge

Every member of LIM College can take a pledge to end violence against women. Go to www.ItsOnUs.org watch the video and take the pledge!

Additional Resources:

http://womenshealth.gov/violence-against-women/index.html?from=AtoZ

https://www.notalone.gov/

http://www.bestcolleges.com/resources/preventing-sexual-assault/

For a listing of additional resources and further details of LIM College’s procedures for reporting a sexual assault please see the College’s Annual Security and Fire Safety Report at https://www.limcollege.edu/annualsecurityreport

Quote:

"Perhaps most important, we need to keep saying to anyone out there who has ever been assaulted: you are not alone. We have your back. I’ve got your back." President Barack Obama, January 22, 2014

Definitions

Sexual assault: means an offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting system. A sex offense is any act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim if incapable of giving consent.

Rape is defined as the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.

Fondling is defined as the touching of the private parts of another person for the purposes of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.

Incest is defined as non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
Statutory Rape is defined as non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Recent legislation also makes it a felony to engage in video voyeurism, secretly capturing images of another person in a private place without consent.

Whether or not specifically stated, it is an element of every sexual assault that the sexual act was committed without consent of the victim.

Lack of consent results from forcible compulsion, incapacity to consent, or, where the offense charged is sexual abuse, any circumstances, in addition to forcible compulsion or incapacity to consent, in which the victim does not expressly or implicitly acquiesce in the actor's conduct.
For more information about how sex offenses are classified in criminal law in the state of New York, visit http://www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/nsor/sortab1.htm.

Domestic Violence: The U.S. Department of Education defines the new crime category of ‘‘domestic violence’’ as follows: Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed

  1. By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
  2. By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
  3. By a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;
  4. By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or
  5. By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and section 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Intimate Partner: Includes persons legally married to one another; persons formerly married to one another; persons who have a child in common, regardless of whether such persons are married or have lived together at any time, couples who are in an “intimate relationship” including but not limited to couples who live together or have lived together, or persons who are dating or who have dated in the past, including same sex couples.
In the State of New York, domestic violence includes actual physical abuse, an attempt to harm another, placing another in fear of imminent, serious, physical harm, like violating a protective order, or causing another to engage in sexual relations by force, threat of force, or duress perpetrated by one person against an adult intimate partner, with the goal of establishing and maintaining power and control over the victim.
For more information about how domestic violence offenses are classified in criminal law in the state of New York, visit http://www.opdv.ny.gov/index.html.

Dating Violence: The U.S. Department of Education defines the new crime category of ‘‘dating violence’’ as follows:
"Dating violence" means violence committed by a person

  1. who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and
  2. where the existence of such a relationship shall be based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

For the purposes of this definition

  1. Dating Violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
  2. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and section 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting. Dating violence includes the use or threat of physical force or restraint carried out with the intent of causing pain or injury to another within a dating relationship.

Dating Violence is not defined in New York State Penal Law.

Stalking: The U.S. Department of Education defines the new crime category of ‘‘stalking’’ as follows:
The term “stalking” means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to

  1. fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
  2. suffer substantial emotional distress.

For the purposes of this definition

  1. Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
  2. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. 37
  3. Reasonable persons means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and section 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Current New York stalking law (established in 1999) focuses on the state of mind of the stalking victim and the reasonable fear that the stalker's behavior is likely to cause the victim.

  1. Stalker need not intend fear, rather, a reasonable person should expect this behavior to make someone fearful.
  2. The victim need not experience actual fear, rather, would a reasonable person have been made fearful, based on history, context, etc.
  3. There are four counts of stalking under NYS Penal Law, of varying degrees of severity depending on the stalker's behavior.

For more information about how stalking offenses are defined and classified in criminal law in the state of New York, visit: http://www.opdv.ny.gov/professionals/criminal_justice/stalking.html

The New York State Penal Law provides for the following possible penalties for the various classifications of sexual and domestic assault offenses, to include stalking, depending on what the perpetrator is convicted of: Class B Felony - Imprisonment for 5 to 25 years Class C Felony - Imprisonment for 3 1/2 to 15 years Class D Felony - Imprisonment for 2 to 7 years Class E Felony - Imprisonment for 1 1/2 to 4 years Class A Misdemeanor - Imprisonment for up to 1 year Class B Misdemeanor - Imprisonment for up to 3 months  

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1Hirsch, Kathleen (1990)”Fraternities of Fear: Gang Rape, Male Bonding, and the Silencing of Women.” Ms., 1(2) 52-56.
2Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2001
3Dennison, Callie. Criminal Victimization 1998. Bureau of Justice Stats, DOJ.
4Abbey et al., 1996a, 1998; Copenhaver and Grauerholz, 1991; Harrington and Leitenberg, 1994; Presley et al., 199). Koss (1988),
5Acquaintance Rape: The Hidden Crime, 1991.