Protest Safety

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the United States Congress from enacting legislation that would abridge the right of the people to assemble peaceably and The Fourteenth Amendment makes this prohibition applicable to state governments.1 As we have seen in recent months, some assemblies and/or protests have become less than peaceful. This document is intended to provide LIM College community members with simple guidelines and actions to take to stay safe during protests.

  1. If you plan to attend or participate in the protest, do some research and determine if similar protests have become violent. If so, try to avoid the protest.
  2. Do not wear any masks, bandanas or face coverings to a protest. Doing so may signal to law enforcement and others that you may intend to cause disruption or violate the law.
  3. If you have a sign, refrain from attaching a stick or anything that could be used as a weapon to the sign.
  4. Avoid carrying back packs or bags.
  5. If violence or disorder erupts, leave the area and follow police directions.
  6. Identify safe-havens near the protest. This could include drug stores, restaurants, coffee shops, or locations with individuals who can help keep you safe or can easily contact emergency responders.
  7. If you encounter a moving protest that may become violent, move to a safe area and plan an alternate route.
  8. If protests are in the area of LIM College facilities, those facilities may need to be temporarily closed. The College will send temporary closure notices using the Mass Notification System. Messages will be sent via text, email and voice communication.
  9. If the College is affected, contact the LIM College Emergency Number which is 711 from in internal LIM College phone or 212 310-0660 from an outside line or cell phone.
  10. If police are not present and violence ensues, call 911.

We are fortunate to live in a Country with tremendous freedoms and protections. We all have the right to free speech and to peacefully assemble. Violence at most demonstrations is non-existent but it is always prudent to be prepared for emergency situations.

US Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/law/help/peaceful-assembly/us.php